Medical Information

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Osteoarthisis of the hip

Arthrosis is a painful and invalidating condition characterized by progressive destruction of articulations…

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Osteoarthritis affects the entire joint, with progressive loss of articular cartilage, bone deformities that can impair movement (cysts and abnormal growths called osteophytes), and weakening and loosening of muscles and ligaments that normally provide support and stability for the joint.

The first sign of osteoarthritis is usually localized pain in the crease of the groin, which can radiate to the front of the thigh or the side of the hip. In the beginning, the pain is triggered by physical activities such as running, walking, jumping or going up and down stairs. Gradually, pain appears after shorter walking distances, and becomes increasingly limiting. As the lesions get worse, the range of motion of the joint is limited and limping appears.

The current evidence-based recommendation is to initiate appropriate treatment without delay when the first symptoms appear (conservative at first, then surgical if the painful symptomatology persists despite a well-managed conservative treatment) because the prognosis is better if the treatment is initiated quickly.

Osteoarthisis of the knee

Arthrosis is a painful and invalidating condition characterized by progressive destruction of articulations…

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Osteoarthritis affects the entire joint, with progressive loss of articular cartilage, bone deformities that can impair movement (cysts and abnormal growths called osteophytes), and weakening and loosening of muscles and ligaments that normally provide support and stability for the joint.

The first sign of osteoarthritis is usually pain in the knee area. The pain typically manifests after prolonged rest, by morning stiffness, and is triggered by physical activities such as running, walking, jumping, or climbing and descending stairs. One can also experience fatigue-related pain, when standing for a long time for example. Gradually, pain appears after shorter walking distances, and becomes increasingly limiting. As the lesions get worse, the range of motion of the joint is limited and limping appears. 

Tear of the anterior cruciate ligament

When the cruciate ligaments are ruptured by an injury, consolidation of the knee’s stability is crucial to prevent subsequent lesions…

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A set of four ligaments are involved in maintaining the knee’s stability: two collateral ligaments, placed on each side of the knee, ensure lateral stability, and two cruciate ligaments (so called because they cross inside the joint), provide antero-posterior stability.

By its position, the anterior cruciate ligament is more frequently injured than the posterior cruciate ligament, however during violent trauma both ligaments can be injured. It is less common for the posterior cruciate ligament to be torn alone.

We advise you to see a doctor as soon as possible to clarify the diagnosis and check if other structures are affected, by a complete clinical examination of the knee and if necessary by imaging. The choice to operate or not has to be considered on a case by case basis, depending on the sports activities you wish to practice, your level of activity and your professional activity.

Whatever your choice regarding surgery, it is recommended that you start a physiotherapy rehabilitation program as soon as possible. In the case of a conservative treatment, with the aim of strengthening the overall stability of the knee through the muscles and gradually working on restoring movement.

Some of our frequently performed interventions

Total hip prosthesis

If pain limits your movements and hinders your quality of life, it may be time to consider a hip prosthesis with your doctor.

Résultat: la maladie progresse et toutes vos articulations sont plus vulnérables. 

Although a prosthesis is not quite the equivalent of a new hip, it allows in the vast majority of cases to resume most of the activities and hobbies that were limited before the intervention. The intervention generally enables restored painless mobility of the hip, to recover one’s walking ability and a quality of life as close to normal as possible.

This involves placing one implant in the pelvis and another in the femur, the two then articulating with each other.

Partial or total knee prosthesis

When the lesions are localized on only part of the joint, it is possible to replace only the tissues affected by the prosthetic articular surface, and thus preserve part of the “natural” bone. We are talking about partial knee prosthesis.

When the lesions are spread over the entire joint, it is necessary to replace it entirely with the prosthetic surface, and we speak of total knee prosthesis (or PTG).

Our concern, of course, is to do everything to make your treatment a success. There are several factors making it possible to improve the prognosis: the quality of physical preparation before the operation, in particular by an optimal combination of muscular strengthening exercises and stretching, an effective and well-followed rehabilitation, as well as of course adequate choice of surgical technique and precision when placing the implant: a well-placed prosthesis and a knee protected by well-maintained muscles.

Our entire team of specialists is at your side to support you through each phase of the treatment.

Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

It is very often possible to live without an anterior cruciate ligament. An effective conservative treatment, rehabilitation and muscle strengthening can often be enough to stabilize the knee, provided that the other structures important for the stability of the knee are preserved and solid, and that sports or professional activity do not put too much stress on the knee.

Once the acute and inflammatory phase has passed, the pain gradually subsides.

If the knee is not sufficiently stable compared to the stresses to which it is subjected, however, in the medium term there is the risk of subsequent injury and worsening of the lesions, and in the longer term the development of early osteoarthritis.

We generally recommend, based on the current evidence, to choose a surgical treatment for young and active people, especially if they practice pivot sports such as tennis, football, volleyball or skiing, or when their professional activity requires good knee stability or prolonged standing.

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